Can Music Reverse Global Warming? Here’s Hoping

May 16th, 2014 § 0 comments § permalink

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It seems universally acknowledged that music has a positive effect on people. From Mozart CDs for babies to the music played for the senior residents through the Musicians Care Project at Hebrew Healthcare, society embraces music, and particularly classical music, as a means for improving intelligence, social interaction, and personal development. Although the “Mozart Effect” fad of the early 90’s has been somewhat debunked, there is still overwhelming evidencethat focused participation in musical ensembles and active listening to music has positive effects on the brain.

But can music positively change the physical world? Next month, the HSO will perform a piece that might suggest it can. The work is Alternative Energy by composer and West Coast DJ Mason Bates.

Bates says about this piece:

“Alternative Energy is an ‘energy symphony’ spanning four movements and hundreds of years.  Beginning in a rustic Midwestern junkyard in the late 19thCentury, the piece travels through ever greater and more powerful forces of energy — a present-day particle collider, a futuristic Chinese nuclear plant — until it reaches a future Icelandic rainforest, where humanity’s last inhabitants seek a return to a simpler way of life.”

Bates’ takes his inspiration from the things that physically fuel our world today. He walked around a particle collider, recording “huge power surges, epic hydraulic releases, [and] alien-sounding high frequencies,” which are interspersed into the hall in a surround sound like experience for the audience, as if they are inside the particle collider.

 

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Bates also asks the performers to create and play on a drum set made out of foraged car parts. Last week, HSO Principal Percussionist Robert McEwan traveled with the HSO Tech crew to a local junk yard to seek out the pieces he would need to make the drum set.

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HSO Percussionist Robert McEwan looking for drum set pieces

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They left with a muffler, a tailgate from a truck, a gas tank, a fender and a few other miscellaneous pieces. In a few weeks this junk  will be transformed into an orchestral instrument. Not only do we think these pieces will look fantastic on The Belding stage, but with one perfectly timed mallet strike our musicians will turn this garbage into music.

Will our performance of Alternative Energy reverse global warming?  Alternative Energy will do what music does best- make us take a step back and think about ourselves and our environment. It suggests a path for the future where we rely on our existing resources, like musical instruments made from recycled junk. Will the audience be inspired to decrease their own carbon footprint, advocate for cleaner fuel sources, and teach the value of environmental conservation to future generations? Here’s hoping.

Food Drive This Saturday

December 18th, 2013 § 0 comments § permalink

The Hartford Symphony Orchestra is teaming up with the South Park Inn for a food drive at the time of year when our community needs it most. We encourage you to bring non-perishable food items to the Hartford Symphony Orchestra’sHoliday Cirque Spectacular on December 21 to help out those in need this holiday season. The items that are most needed are:

Beans

Canned Chicken

Canned Fruit

Canned Vegetables

Canned Tuna

Cereal

Coffee

Granola Bars

Jarred baby food

Laundry Detergent

Lentils

Pasta

Peanut Butter

Rice

Toiletries

There will be drop off tables throughout the lobby at The Bushnell where you can leave your food donation.

Looking for a place to eat before or after the show? On December 21,Peppercorn’s Grill will donate 5% of their food sales to South Park Inn. Help feed someone in need as you enjoy a meal at one of Hartford’s finest restaurants.

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Thank you for lending a hand to help our neighbors in need and see you at the Hartford Symphony’s Holiday Cirque Spectacular.

Today is #GivingTuesday

December 3rd, 2013 § 0 comments § permalink

The days after Thanksgiving have become synonymous with the pursuit of bargains. From “Black Friday” to “Cyber Monday,” retailers try to pull us away from the intended purpose of the holiday season. This year, the HSO is joining a group of charitable and socially conscious organizations that would live to encourage you to give thanks and give back this Thanksgiving.

Today is “Giving Tuesday.”

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In the spirit of Thanksgiving, we hope you will show your thanks by giving back to the charitable organizations that make this community thrive. Please consider making a gift to the Hartford Symphony Orchestra today.

Your gift makes it possible for us to bring the highest level of artistry to Connecticut.

From the concert hall to the classroom, the HSO enhances the lives of young people from throughout Connecticut through our educational and communityengagement programs.

The HSO has been bringing the joy of music to the region for 70 years. We invite you to help us keep the momentum going and create harmony in Hartford for years to come.

Our music would not be possible without your generous support. Please give generously and join us in celebrating 70 seasons of artistry, community, harmony and symphony.

Make your gift by December 31 to take advantage of potential tax savings!

Three easy ways to give:
Donate Now online
• Call 860-246-8742, ext. 326, Monday – Friday, 9am-5pm
• Mail to: 100 Pearl Street, 2nd Floor, East Tower. Hartford, CT 06103

A contribution to the HSO’s Annual Fund is an investment in our community and the music you love.

Bachtoberfest: Hartford’s Bach and Organ Music Festival

October 1st, 2013 § 0 comments § permalink

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To kick off our 70th Anniversary Season, we are presenting Bachtoberfest, a new music festival featuring music by Bach and music written for organ, October 4-12, 2013. The Hartford Chapter of the American Guild of Organists is the primary community partner for the festival; their members will be featured prominently on many of the performances and events. The festival will culminate with our 70thAnniversary Opening Night Concerts at The Bushnell Center for the Performing Arts on October 11 & 12.

The festival includes free concerts and events at the Austin Organ Factory, Cathedral of Saint Joseph, Congregation Beth Israel, Hartford Public Library, Christ Church Cathedral, St. Patrick St. Anthony, St. Brigid’s Church, First Church of Christ, United Methodist of West Hartford, and Central Baptist Church, amongst others.

HSO President & CEO Carrie Hammond says, “The Hartford Symphony Orchestra is dedicated to fostering musical performances and inspiring others to present community-minded concerts. Bachtoberfest celebrates the uniquely rich musical offerings that are available in this area throughout the year. Hartford possesses a hidden gem in the Austin Organ Company, which has produced organs since 1893. Scattered throughout this region, including The Bushnell Center for the Performing Arts, are these world renowned instruments and performers who are drawn to this area to play them. We are thrilled to present this week-long series of events with the Hartford Chapter of the American Guild of Organists.”

BACHTOBERFEST CALENDAR OF EVENTS:

Friday, October 4, 2013

Austin Organ Factory Tour
Hartford
11:00 a.m.
A behind the scenes tour of the history Austin Organ Company and factory. Closed event for HSO subscribers;  events@hartfordsymphony.org for more information.

Saturday, October 5, 2013

Organ Tour: United Methodist Church of Hartford
Hartford
10:00 a.m.
Cheryl Wadsworth, organ

Sunday, October 6, 2013

Bach Prelude, Postlude and Choral Anthem: First Church of Christ
Wethersfield
8:45 and 10:30 a.m.
David Spicer, organ
First Church of Christ Choir
8:45 a.m.
Bach Prelude
10:30 a.m.
Bach Postlude and Choral Anthem

Bach Prelude: Hilltop Covenant Church
Cromwell
9:30 a.m.
Carolyn Johnson, organ
Prelude (Fantasia) in G minor, BWV 542

Bach Prelude: First Church of Christ, Congregational
Farmington
10:00 a.m.
Edward Clark, organ
Hartford Symphony organist Edward Clark will perform Bach’s Chorale Prelude on “An Wasserflüssen Babylon,” BWV 653 on his morning service. Get a sneak peak of the talent that will be featured on the HSO’s Opening Night Performances October 11 & 12!

Organ Recital: Cathedral of Saint Joseph
Hartford
10:00 a.m.
Dr. Ezequiel Menéndez, organ

Bach Prelude, Postlude and Choral Anthem: Christ Church Cathedral
Hartford
10:00 a.m.
Deniz Uz, organ; Joshua Slater, music director
Choral Anthem: BWV 106b, O Jesu Christ meins Lebens Licht; Postlude: Prelude and Fugue in E minor, BWV 548

Bach Prelude: First Church of Christ, Congregational
Farmington
10:00 a.m.
Edward Clark, organ
Hartford Symphony organist Edward Clark will perform Bach’s Chorale Prelude on “An Wasserflüssen Babylon,” BWV 653 on his morning service. Get a sneak peak of the talent that will be featured on the HSO’s Opening Night Performances October 11 & 12!

Bach Prelude and Postlude: St. Mary’s Episcopal Church
Manchester
10:00 a.m.
Deborah Gemma, organ

Bach Prelude, Postlude and Choral Anthem: St. Patrick-St. Anthony Church
Hartford
10:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
10:00 a.m. Mass
Organ Prelude:
Prelude in E Major (BWV 854), from The Well-Tempered Clavier
The Gallery Choir directed by Gabriel Löfvall, will sing Jesu, Meine Freunde, BVW 227
Organ Postlude:
Prelude in G major (BWV 860), from The Well-Tempered Clavier
5:00 p.m. Mass
Same organ prelude and postlude as at 10:00 a.m. Mass, plus:
The Treble Clef Choir directed by Pamela Johnson, Gabriel Löfvall, will sing Liebster Jesu, Wir Sind Hier, BVW 373, and Den Tod, from Cantata BWV 4 (Christ lag in Todes Banden).

Bach Prelude & Postlude: St. John’s Episcopal Church
West Hartford
10:30 a.m.
Peter Berton, organ; Tanya Anisimova, cello
Prelude: All glory be to God on high, BWV 676, Postlude: Cello Suite No. 1 in G Major, BWV 1007,VI. Gigue

Bach Prelude, Postlude & Choral Anthem: St. Brigid’s Catholic Church
West Hartford
11:00 a.m.
Natasha Ulyanovsky, organ

Choral Sing-Along: St. Brigid’s Catholic Church
West Hartford
6:20 p.m.
Join the St. Brigid choir and soloists Kelly and David Boudreaux for this public sing along of Bach’s choral works.

Monday, October 7, 2013

HSO Musical Dialogues Series: Bach’s Lunch
Hartford Symphony Orchestra String Quartet
Hartford Public Library, Downtown Branch
12:00 noon
HSO Musicians will discuss and perform works by Bach at this free lunchtime concert. Repertoire will include Bach’s Contrapunctus I, IV, & IX from The Art of the Fugue, Fantasia & Fugue in G minor, and Aria & Variations 1-8 from Goldberg Variations, plus Robert Schumann’s Fugues No. 3 & 5 from “Six Fugues on B-A-C-H” and Clara Schumann’s  Three Fugues on Themes of J.S. Bach.
Sponsored by Travelers

Tuesday, October 8, 2013

Organ Recital: Happy Recollections at Congregation Beth Israel
West Hartford
1:00 p.m.
Natasha Ulyanovsky, organ; Peter Dzialo, cello
Program to include Toccata by Theodore Dubois, Happy Recollections by David Popper; Sonata in D Major by J.S.Bach; Strange Meadow Lark by Dave Brubeck; La Folia by Arcangelo Corelli; and Peacherine Rag by Scott Joplin.

Thursday, October 10, 2013

Organ Recital: Midday Music at Central Baptist Church
Hartford
12:00 noon
Kari Miller and Jason Roberts, organists
Program to include Bach’s Nun Komm der Heiden Heiland (‘Savior of the Heathen, Come’), BWV 659 and Allein Gott in der Höh sei Ehr (‘All Glory Be to God on High’), BWV 662, plus Vivaldi’s Concerto in A Minor, BWV 593

Friday, October 11, 2013

Organ Recital: Aetna
11:30 a.m.
Brian Parks, organ
Concert is closed for Aetna employees only.

Friday & Saturday, October 11 & 12, 2013

HSO Masterworks Series & Special Event: 70th Anniversary Opening Night!
Mortensen Hall at the The Bushnell Center for the Performing Arts
8:00 p.m.
Hartford Symphony Orchestra; Carolyn Kuan, conductor; Edward Clark, organ; Connecticut Youth Symphony, Daniel D’Addio, music director; Wu Man, pipa
We’re rolling out the red carpet for Opening Night! Two of the most famous works in the organ repertoire, Saint-Saëns’ massive Symphony No. 3 and Bach’s glorious Toccata and Fugue in D minor, will be played on The Bushnell’s historic, Hartford-made Austin pipe organ with the Hartford Symphony Orchestra.

Musicians Care Project

September 17th, 2013 § 0 comments § permalink

I will be the first to admit that, as a writer, brevity is not my strong suit.  It would be completely fair for anyone who reads my writing to accuse me of being both long-winded and verbose.  Well, in this post, I am going to fight that urge and let someone else do the talking (well, most of it at least).

Over the past year, the Community Engagement & Education team at the Hartford Symphony Orchestra has embarked on a new challenge called the Musicians Care Project.  Thanks to the generosity of the Ann and Gordon Getty Foundation, the HSO has been able to establish a strong presence and partnership with Hebrew Health Care.  Through this partnership, the HSO has been able to bring live musical performances to hundreds of people whose healthcare needs would prevent them from taking part in traditional concerts.  The HSO is committed to being a source of artistic excellence and community service in our community.  Knowing firsthand the power of music, we are hoping that the Musicians Care Project will help to broaden an understanding of how music can directly impact the wellness of patients, their families, their caregivers, and the musicians who participate.

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I could certainly go on for a number more paragraphs telling stories of my visits to Hebrew Health Care during the pilot phase of the Musicians Care Project.  Some could bring tears to your eyes, while others would almost surely have you doubled over with laughter.  However, I am aiming to brief in this post, and I think there is a better voice to talk about the power of a program like the Musicians Care Project.

The video below is an interview I conducted with Pamela Atwood, Director of Dementia Care Services at Hebrew Health Care.  A musician herself, Pam is a certified gerontologist who has worked with HSO musicians in preparing for the Musicians Care Project and attended many of the performances at Hebrew Health Care.  I promised to be brief (or at least more so than usual), so I’ll let Pam’s words do the rest of the talking about the profound impact the HSO is making on our community through the Musicians Care Project.

— Jeff Martin, Director of Community Engagement & Education

Drink a Beer and Support the Symphony

September 4th, 2013 § 0 comments § permalink

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Back East Brewery and the Hartford Symphony Orchestra have releasedBachtoberfest, an Oktoberfest-style seasonal beer produced by Back East Brewery. Beginning the week of August 26th, Bachtoberfest will be available on tap at many great restaurants throughout the Greater Hartford and New Haven markets, including several restaurants in downtown Hartford. Bachtoberfest also will be available for purchase at the Hartford Symphony’s 70th Anniversary Opening Night performances at The Bushnell Center for the Performing Arts October 11 and 12.  Beginning August 28th, Bachtoberfest will be available for purchase in half-gallon growlers in the tasting room at Back East Brewery in Bloomfield, CT.  Back East will be donating a portion of the proceeds from each growler sold to the Hartford Symphony Orchestra in support of their artistic, educational, and community programs.

Rite of Spring Turns 100

May 24th, 2013 § Comments Off on Rite of Spring Turns 100 § permalink

Wednesday, May 29 will mark the 100 anniversary of the premiere of Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring.

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So why do we care?

Because this premiere was a game-changer. Many scholars would argue that, along with the premiere of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, no other work in this history of Western music had the seismic effect that Rite of Spring had at its premiere.

What happened at the premiere?

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Stravinsky’s conception for Rite came to him as he was finishing The Firebird in 1910. He had a vision of “a solemn pagan rite; wise elders, seated in a circle, watching a young girl dance herself to death. They were sacrificing her to propitiate the god of spring.” Stravinsky knew that Nicholas Roerich, a friend who was an archeologist and an authority on the ancient Slavs, would be interested in his idea, and he mentioned it to him. Stravinsky also shared the vision with Serge Diaghilev, impresario of the Ballet Russe, the company that had commissionedThe Firebird. All three men were excited by the possibilities of the project — Diaghilev promised a production and encouraged Stravinsky to begin work immediately.

“What I was trying to convey in The Rite,” said Stravinsky, “was the surge of spring, the magnificent upsurge of nature reborn.” Inspired by childhood memories of the coming of spring to Russia (“which seemed to begin in an hour and was like the whole earth cracking,” he remembered), he worked with Roerich to devise a libretto which would, in Roerich’s words, “present a number of scenes of earthly joy and celestial triumph as understood by the ancient Slavs.” Stravinsky labored feverishly on the score through the winter of 1911-1912, realizing by that time that he was composing an important piece in a startling new style. “I was guided by no system whatever in The Rite of Spring,” he wrote. “Very little immediate tradition lies behind it. [Debussy was the only influence he admitted.] I had only my ear to help me. I heard, and I wrote what I heard. I am the vessel through which The Ritepassed.”

Diaghilev scheduled the premiere for May 1913, and Nijinsky was chosen to do the choreography. Stravinsky, however,

objected to Nijinsky’s selection because of the dancer’s inexperience as a choreographer and his lack of understanding of the technical aspects of the music, but preparations were begun and continued through more than 120 rehearsals. Pierre Monteux drilled the orchestra to the point of anxious readiness. The guests invited to the final dress rehearsal seemed to appreciate the striking modernity of the work, but gave no hint of the donnybrook that was to roar through the Théâtre des Champs-Elysées at the public premiere on May 29th.

Almost as soon as the curtain rose, a riot broke out the like of which had not been inspired by a piece of music since Nero’s song of antiquity. Shouts, catcalls, whistles, even fisticuffs grew so menacing that often the orchestra could not be heard. Diaghilev flashed the house lights on and off in a vain attempt to restore order; Nijinsky, when he was not on stage, pounded wildly on the scenery with his fists to keep the dancers together; Stravinsky ran out of the auditorium (“as angry as I have ever been in my life”) and spent most of the evening backstage pacing in the wings. Somehow Monteux (“cool as a crocodile,” recalled Stravinsky) guided the performance through to the end. Puccini thought The Rite “might be the creation of a madman” and the critic of the New York Sun nominated the composer as “the cave man of music.”

No one could deny, however, the ferocious, overwhelming power of the music, and when audiences began to listen to the work on its own, revolutionary terms, they could not help but be swept away by its awesome and wonderful maelstrom of exquisitely executed sound. Within a year of its stage premiere, Koussevitzky in Russia and Monteux in Paris had conducted concert performances of The Rite, and the work’s position in the orchestral repertory was soon secured.*

Rite’s choreography struck a nerve with audiences as well. Nijinsky asked the dancers to break all the rules of traditional ballet by having them stand pigeon toed with their other limbs at sharp angles.

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The sets and costumes from the original production were designed and created by the mystical painter and professional ethnographer Nikolai Roerich. Three of the original costumes and a sketch by Roerich will be on display at theWadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art in Hartford starting from May 29-June 23. Patrons who visit the museum from May 29-June 2 may present their admission receipt in person at HSO Ticket Services on May 29- 31 or at The Bushnell Box Office from May 29-June 2 to receive $5 off an adult ticket (does not apply to previously purchased tickets). Additionally, HSO audiences will be able to present their Rite of Spring performance ticket stub at the Wadsworth Atheneum from May 31-June 23 to receive $5 off museum/adult admission. For more information about the Wadsworth Atheneum, please visit www.thewadsworth.org.

As with stage performance of Shakespeare’s Macbeth, the lore and mystery surrounding this premiere is still carried by performers today. HSO Maestra Carolyn Kuan said in a recent tweet, “Immersed in the world of #RiteofSpring and feeling intoxicated with that wonderful artistic madness.” Like a scar, the wildness of the premiere forever ensured that all future performances would be possessed by a chaotic, haunting character.

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The HSO will honor this groundbreaking premiere 100 years later with four full performances of Rite of Spring, featuring more than 100 musicians onstage and two soloists from The Hartt School Dance Division on Thursday, May 30 – Sunday, June 2, 2013 at the Bushnell Center for the Performing Arts. For tickets and more information, please visit http://www.hartfordsymphony.org.

(*Taken from Program Notes by Dr. Richard Rodda)

5 days until LIFE: The Nature Conservancy

April 22nd, 2013 § 1 comment § permalink

As we count down to this Saturday’s performance of LIFE: A Journey Through Time, we will highlight our final LIFE community sponsors, The Nature Conservancy. On Saturday, April 27 at 7:30 p.m., the Hartford Symphony will perform LIFE: A Journey Through Time, beginning with a panel discussion featuring Dr. Frogard Ryan, Executive Director of The Nature Conservancy in Connecticut. She, along with National Geographic Photographer Frans Lanting and Daniel C. Esty, Commissioner of the Connecticut Department of Energy & Environmental Protection, will discuss the impact that the public and the arts can have on Nature Conservation efforts around the state.

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The mission of The Nature Conservancy is to conserve the lands and waters on which all life depends. For more than 50 years, the Connecticut Chapter has worked with its partners to protect and conserve Connecticut’s wondrous forests, rivers and shoreline. In 2012 alone, The Nature Conservancy in Connecticut planted American Elm trees resistant to Dutch elm disease in three communities to help restore elm populations, as well as the species they support;maintained the 14,000-acre preserve network while adding 212 more acres; opened 63 miles of river through dam removal; secured $50,000 in grant funding to help protect Brazil’s Atlantic Forest; focused our work in Long Island Sound to protect habitats and restore water quality; secured $200,000 in federal grant funding for coastal resilience to advance nature-friendly solutions, such as tidal marsh migration; assisted nine Connecticut communities with a climate preparedness planning process; and taken a lead in climate disaster-risk preparedness. This work and more continue every day, through our supporters’ generosity, so that we and future generations can enjoy our one-of-a-kind Connecticut life.

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How Can I Help?

Donations to The Nature Conservancy can be mailed to 55 Church Street, Fl 3, New Haven, CT 06510. Phone donations can be made to Laura Brownstein at 203-568-6278 and Laura Weinberg at 203-568-6281. Online donations can be made to nature.org/connecticut (choose Connecticut in the designation field). General volunteers inquiries can be made to Laura Brownstein  at 203-568-6278 or Martha Rice at 203-568-6294; At Devil’s Den Preserve: Cynthia Fowx at  203-226-4991, ext. 116; and At Sunny Valley Preserve: Laura Shail at 860-355-3716.

You can contact The Nature Conservancy in Connecticut at:
55 Church Street, Fl 3
New Haven, CT 06510
203.568.6270 phone
203.568.6271 fax
nature.org/connecticut
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18 days until LIFE: Rivers Alliance of Connecticut

April 9th, 2013 § 0 comments § permalink

As we count down to the April 27th performance of LIFE: A Journey Through Time, we will highlight our LIFE community sponsors, continuing today with Rivers Alliance of Connecticut:

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Rivers Alliance of Connecticut is the only statewide 501(c) (3) non-profit dedicated to protecting and enhancing Connecticut’s rivers, streams, and aquifers.  Our members are individuals, organizations, and corporations concerned with the health and conservation of the state’s waters.  Rivers Alliance was founded in 1992 to promote and support environmentally sound state policies; to assist the state’s many watershed and river groups; and to educate the public about the value of water and aquatic habitats. Our talented twelve-member Board of Directors includes representatives from the state’s major river and watershed organizations.

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Looking ahead to 2013 and beyond, we will be working on the following issues:

  • Protecting state-conserved watershed lands that are at risk of takeover for private development.
  • Reversing the proliferation of harmful pesticides.
  • Preserving and enhancing streamflow.
  • Cleaning up and protecting groundwater.
  • Rolling back the state’s draconian water secrecy laws.
  • Promoting a rational, fair statewide water management plan.                                                                                               river-alliance_quinnipiac-river                                                                                                                                            How can you help?                                                                                                                                                        river-alliance_margaret-invertebrate-sampling                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             Funding for Rivers Alliance is received from our members, grants, and special events.  Membership categories are:  Individuals and Families: $35.00; Nonprofit Organizations: $50.00; Patrons: $50.00; Sponsors: $100.00; Businesses: $250.00; Sustainers: $250.00; Benefactors: $500; Guardians: $1,000.00.  Membership donations can be mailed to: Rivers Alliance, P.O. Box 1797, Litchfield CT  06759, or made securely online at http://www.riversalliance.org. If you would like to volunteer, please e-mail rivers@riversalliance.org or call us at (860) 361-9349.
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32 Days Until LIFE: Riverfront Recapture

March 26th, 2013 § 0 comments § permalink

As we count down to the April 27 performance of LIFE: A Journey Through Time, we will highlight our LIFE community sponsors, continuing today with Riverfront Recapture:

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Riverfront Recapture is a unique private, non-profit organization dedicated to improving central Connecticut’s quality of life and urban vitality through cultural events, entertainment, group sports and recreation in a welcoming environment along the banks of the Connecticut River, as well as ongoing efforts to protect and maintain the riverfront and make more of it accessible to the public.  It is the first and only organization in the region to offer this combination of programming, all designed to connect people to the river, get them back in touch with nature within an urban environment and provide them with experiences they might not otherwise have. Riverfront Recapture began in 1981 with the goal of transforming the banks of the Connecticut River from an area walled off by flood dikes and cut off by Interstate 91 into a vibrant, active riverfront of four parks connected by riverwalks and bridges.  The Riverfront parks currently attract nearly one million visitors a year.  The organization is dedicated to preserving the hard work and investment it began 31 years ago while it looks to expand and enhance the park system.riverfront-r_g5

Thanks to the annual support of hundreds of individuals and many family foundations, our festivals, youth enrichment programs, concerts and athletic competitions are offered to the public free of charge. Riverfront Recapture could not accomplish its wide range of activities without public support.  Donations can be made online at www.riverfront.org, or by calling 860-713-3131 x 326.

How can you help?

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Do you have free time?  Want to learn more about your community and its history and help make a difference to the people who love our parks?
Why not join the Riverfront family as a volunteer.  Riverfront volunteers are a vital part of the Riverfront Recapture family. They are depended on to help organize and assist at events, enhance visitors’ experience, lend a hand with landscaping and gardening and offer youth programming options to area kids.  When you volunteer, you’re applying your time and talents in ways that positively impact the individuals, organizations and corporations using the riverfront park system. You’ll meet and work with great people, and enhance the staff’s knowledge by sharing your own skills and experiences.  Individuals, families and groups are all welcome. Please help provide our Metro Hartford residents and visitors an inviting, well-kept park system and free, quality events.  Volunteer today, and fill your tomorrows with excitement, learning and fun!  Please call Samantha at 860-713-3131 x 305 or email scappelletti@riverfront.org.

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